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insight by wfx

Welcome to Wordwide FX's new enterprise!

Insight by WFX is a synthesis of our passion for languages and the financial markets. Here you will find technical and fundamental analyses from our clients, media partners and contributors in different languages, as well as discussions on languages and translation. And of course we will keep you updated on what is happening inside Wordwide FX Financial Translations. Hope you enjoy it! Greetings from the Wordwide FX team!

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22/03/2019

"Lenten ys come with love to toune..."

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By Wordwide FX Financial Translations

Yesterday in the Northern hemisphere we waved so long to winter and welcomed spring. at least in countries using the astronomical and solar reckoning, because in others countries, like Sweden, the beginning of spring is defined as the first occasion when the average daytime temperature exceeds zero degrees for seven consecutive days, so typically spring comes later in the north than in the south.

In early medieval Engand the usual word for this season was "Lenten", a word that comes from the shortening of "lengthing days" and which Dutch still keeps ("lente"). The word "spring", that didn't catch on until the 16th century, is related to the verb "spring", which in English means "to move or jump suddenly" and in Swedish it means "to run" ("springa"). If you have ever felt that in this season everything seems to move faster, the Germanic languages had already captured this feeling from the very beginning.  

In Old English the word was "springan", meaning "to leap, burst forth, fly up; spread, grow", and further back, in the protolanguage shared by all Germanic tribes, the word was *sprengan (the asterisk means it is a reconstructed form), source also of Old Norse and Old Frisian springa, Middle Dutch springhen, Old High German springan, and German springen). We can even trace the origin to the times of Indoeuropean with the form *sprengh, meaning "to move, hasten, spring", source also of Sanskrit sprhayati "desires eagerly" and Greek sperkhesthai "to hurry".

In other languages, the season name is related to the word "fore" or "early", like in German Frühling (from Middle German vrueje, "early",) or in Swedish "vår" ("before", related to Dutch "voorjaar", literally "fore-year".

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06/03/2019

Hey, America: Y’all need to start saying y’all, linguist says

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By Wordwide FX Financial Translations

Via ai.com

By Greg Garrison

Across America, it’s becoming increasingly common to hear the use of the Southern contraction “Y’all,” a linguistic fusion of the words “you” and “all.”

It may be partly because of the spread of Southern influence nationwide, but it also fills an important need in the English language, said Southern linguist Thomas Nunnally.

“It’s being adopted all over the country, because it needs to be,” said Nunnally, a retired professor of linguistics at Auburn University who spoke at Samford University on Thursday. Nunnally is editor and co-author of “Speaking of Alabama: The History, Diversity, Function and Change of Language,” published by the University of Alabama Press. 

Linguists have noted that “y’all” addresses a gap in the English language left behind by the disappearance of the pronoun “ye,” the second person plural form of the pronoun “thou,” both of which have become stilted, archaic and fallen out of use.

The English language now generally uses the pronoun “you” to function as both singular and plural.

Regional adaptations include “youse” or “Youse guys” in the Northeast; “yunz” or “yinz” in Pittsburgh; the Midwestern “You’nes” a contraction of “you-ones,” or the upper Southern “You all.”

The phrase “you guys” fills the function, but can be seen as uncomfortable because of the masculine word guys.

Nunnally recalls he and his wife being addressed as “you guys,” and he took exception.

“To call my wife a guy, I was aghast,” he said.

Other variations seem to Southern ears to be inadequate.

But the spread of “y’all” shows its appeal and functionality.

“Y’all does it nicely and concisely,” Nunnally said.

“Y’all” is also part of Africa-American Vernacular English, which derives from black language in the South, so musical artists in rap, hip-hop and the larger entertainment culture can play a role in helping its spread.

“Y’all” can also be used in addressing one person, to politely include others, such as in the phrase, “How y’all doing?”

 

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06/03/2019

La GBPUSD se opera en medio del soporte y la resistencia

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By Greg Michalowski @GregMikeFX, Director of Client Education at ForexLive. Translated by Wordwide FX Financial Translations

El par se mantiene por debajo de la MM de 200 horas y por encima de la zona de giro.

El soporte se halla en 1,3092-99, donde están los niveles de giro del 20 de febrero (ver círculos en verde). Los traders se concentraron en esta zona y los compradores se apoyaron en el nivel de soporte. El precio ganó terreno.

Arriba, la resistencia se define por la MM de 200 horas (línea verde) y, como en la zona de soporte, los traders se concentraron en esa zona y los vendedores se apoyaron en la media móvil. El precio perdió terreno.

En la acción bajista de hoy, el precio se ha mantenido durante las últimas 11-12 horas en el 38,2% de la subida que arrancó del mínimo del 14 de febrero – aquí no aparece pero fue un mínimo en swing – en 1,311287. Si el precio baja, los traders deberán considerar el nivel de soporte más bajo. De momento, sin embargo, los compradores siguen manteniendo el control intradiario contra el nivel.

El problema es el rango mínimo a máximo, ya que el suelo es de solo 26 pips (en las últimas 11 barras horarias, aproximadamente). Los traders aguardan la próxima acción fuera de estos niveles.

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28/02/2019

El EURUSD cae bajo la MM de 100 horas

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By Greg Michalowski @GregMikeFX, Director of Client Education at ForexLive. Translated by Wordwide FX Financial Translations

Estamos a fin de mes, de modo que la situación podría calentarse en las próximas horas.

El par sigue bajando, ha caído bajo la MM de 10 días hace un rato, se ha operado alrededor de este nivel y ahora se dirige hacia la MM de 100 horas y la línea de tendencia en la zona de 1,1366-68. Si el precio sigue cayendo, atención al nivel de 1,1348, que coincide con el retroceso de Fibonacci del 38,2% de la subida que arrancó del mínimo del 15 de febrero y la MM de 200 horas (línea verde).

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28/02/2019

Importance Of Indonesian Language And Indonesia Around The Globe

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By Wordwide FX Financial Translations

Via tridindia.com

By Achia Sharma

There is a huge Importance of Indonesian Language and Indonesia, considering the fact that Indonesia is one of the fastest and steadily growing economies in the world today. With a population of more than 43 million natives and a lot of high profile tourist destinations, the. In this article, we will explore the why and how’s of navigating this bustling and highly potential market.

Brief Intro Of The Indonesian Language

Bahasa or Bahasa Indonesia is the official language of the South Asian country of Indonesia. Home to 43 million native speakers, it is undoubtedly one of the most popular languages in the country. The language has been spoken in the land for centuries and therefore is a part of the standardized Register of Malay.

Other than the native language of Bahasa, the 43 million residents of Indonesia are fluent in 700 other local dialects. Prominent examples of these local languages include Sundanese, Javanese and also Balinese. However, despite the popularity of these 700 other languages, the country provides most of its formal education and other official communication to the public in Indonesian, as it is undoubtedly understood by all and even to a large number of immigrants in the country, along with a substantial amount of foreigners visiting the country every year.

The name Indonesian for the language which is originally known as Bahasa Indonesian is commonly found in popular languages spoken in the world and also English.

Popular English words with Indonesian origin

During the rule of the Great Britain in the British colonies of Malay and the monarchy’s short stay in Java, the English language borrowed a substantial number of words from the Indonesian language. These words, borrowed from the Malay language family is also known as kata serapan in the local language. But the distinctive factor is not all words were borrowed from Bahasa alone, some were borrowed from local dialects such as Javanese and Sundanese as well.

The main purpose of loaning words from the Indonesian language is to describe things which are uniquely Indonesian like flora and fauna of the country, known as Cockatoo and Komodo. Both these English words have Indonesian roots. Another popular reason to loan words from Indonesian is to describe the local art forms such as wayang, kris and batik among others.

The most recent stint of borrowing English words from Indonesian is to describe volcanic occurrences and to describe food processing materials such as tempeh and agar. Mentioned below are some of the most popular English words with an Indonesian, Javanese or Sundanese origin. Language learning is fun, and this list will simply give you an idea of that. Also, the list is not exhaustive and has been categorized into subsections for a better understanding of the reader.

1. Animals: Dugong from the Indonesian word Duyung, Orangutan, Siamang, Tokay or gecko from the Javanese word Tolek, Tapir, Bantam named after the town of Banten.

2. Nature: Bamboo from the Indonesian word Bambu, Meranti which is a kind of tropical tree inhabitant to the country, Pandanus from Pandan, Sago from the Indonesian word Sagu, Cajuput from the Indonesian word Kayu Putih.

3. Fruits: Salak from the Indonesian word Zalacca, Papaya from Pepaya, Cempedak and Mangosteen from the Indonesian word Manggis.

4. Food Items: Agar which is used in food processing and manufacture, Ketchup from the Indonesian word kecap which means soy sauce and not tomato sauce, Satay from the Javanese word of Sate.

5. Textiles and Clothes: Batik a type of textile and weaving technique from the Javanese word Batik, Ikat, Songket, Sarong from the Indonesian word Sarung and Canting from the Javanese word Canting.

6. Musical Instruments: Gong which is a very popular musical instrument in the country as well as Gamelan and Angklung.

7. Nautical Archaeology: Popular words used in the industry like Junk which originated from the Indonesian word Jong, Proa from the Javanese word Prahu as well as Indonesian word Perahu.

8. Hoplology: Sjamnok which is a kind of weapon made from wood and used to punish slaves originated from the Indonesian word Cambuk.

9. Anthroponomastics: Popular English names like Mata Hari has its roots in the Indonesian word Mata Hari meaning Sun.

10. Psychology: Psychological terms used to describe the human state and mind like Latah and Amok.

Indonesia Business Economy

Indonesia is one of the richest countries in the world when it comes to the supply of natural resources like natural gas, crude oil, gold and copper. This is why more and more businesses are investing in Indonesian translation, in order to expand their business at the said location. Over the years Indonesia has popularized its name for being a manufacturing centre and the country’s Gross Domestic Product or GDP, and Price Per Capita or PPC is estimated at 3.481 trillion United States Dollar and $13,120 respectively.

 

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31/01/2019

The Widely-Spoken Languages We Still Cannot Translate Online

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By Wordwide FX Financial Translations

Via wired.com

IN THE INTERNET age, when we face a language barrier, there are a host of internet resources to solve it: things like translation apps, dictionary websites, versions of Wikipediain other languages, and the simple "click to translate" option. But there are about 7000 languages spoken in the world today. The top 10 or so are spoken by hundred of millions of speakers; the bottom third have 1000 speakers or fewer.

But in the murky middle ground are a couple hundred languages that are spoken by speakers in millions. These midsize languages are still fairly widely spoken, but they have vastly inconsistent levels of support online. There’s Swedish, which has 9.6 million speakers, the third-largest Wikipedia with over 3 million articles, and support in Google Translate, Bing Translate, Facebook, Siri, YouTube captions, and so on. But there’s also Odia, the official language of the Odisha state in India, with 38 million speakers, which has no presence in Google Translate. And Oromo, a language spoken by some 34 million people, mostly in Ethiopia, which has just 772 articles in its Wikipedia.

Why do Greek, Czech, Hungarian, and Swedish, with their 8 to 13 million speakers, have Google Translate support and robust Wikipedia presences, while languages the same size or larger, like Bhojpuri (51 million), Fula (24 million), Sylheti (11 million), Quechua (9 million), and Kirundi (9 million) languish in technological obscurity?

Part of the reason is that Greek, Czech, Hungarian, and Swedish are among the 24 official languages of the European Union, which means that a small hoard of human translators translate many official European Parliament documents every year. Human-translated documents make a great base for what linguists call a parallel corpus — a large mass of text that's equivalent, sentence-by-sentence, in multiple languages. Machine translation engines use parallel corpora to figure out regular correspondences between languages: if "regering" or "κυβέρνηση" or "kormány" or "vláda" all frequently appear in parallel to "government," then the machine concludes these words are equivalent.

In order to be reasonably effective, machine translation requires an enormous parallel corpus for each language. Ideally, this corpus contains documents from a variety of genres: not just parliamentary proceedings but news reports, novels, film scripts, and so on. The machine can't translate informal social media posts very well if it's been trained only on formal legal documents. Translation tools are already scraping the bottom of the parallel corpus barrel: In many languages, the largest parallel translated text is the Bible, which leads to peculiar circumstances where Google translates nonsense syllables into prophecies of doom.

In addition to EU documents, Swedish, Greek, Hungarian, and Czech have a wealth of language resources, created one human at a time over centuries. They're the languages of entire nation-states, with national TV and radio recordings that can be used as the foundation for text-to-speech models. Their speakers have the kind of disposable income that makes media companies translate popular novels and subtitle foreign movies and TV shows. They're found in countries that tech companies imagine their customers might be living in or might at least visit on holiday, meaning it's worth localizing interfaces and adding them as translation options. They have regularized spelling systems and dictionaries that can be rolled into spellcheckers and predictive text models. They have highly literate speakers with internet access who can contribute to projects like Wikipedia. (Speakers who can even, in the case of Swedish, create a bot to automatically make basic Wikipedia articles for rivers, mountains, and other natural features.)

Language resources don't just appear. People have to decide to create them, and those people need to be fed and watered and educated and housed and supported, whether that's by governments or by companies or by the kind of personal wealth that lets individuals take on time-consuming intellectual hobbies. Creating parallel corpora and other language resources takes years, if it happens at all, and costtens of millions of dollars per language.

Meanwhile, we know that catastrophes periodically happen around the world: earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, cyclones, diseases, famines, fires. Some of them will happen in areas where people speak a large, well-resourced language, and organizations will rush to their aid. But the odds are goodthat some of the world's future crises will happen in areas where people speak one of these medium-size but low-resource languages. In those cases, aid organizations and governments will face an urgent language barrier.

The problem is, we don't know which language will desperately need the world's attention next. When an earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, international organizations suddenly required Haitian Creole resources. Ebola outbreaks in West Africa affected speakers of languages like Swahili, Nande, Mbuba, Krio, Mende and Themne. Asylum seekers from Central America often speak languages like Zapotec, Q’anjob’al, K'iche' and Mam. These speakers aren't the ideal customers of big tech companies. They don't have leisure time to edit Wikipedia. They may not even be literate in their mother tongue, communicating by voice memoinstead of by text message. But when a crisis hits, internet communication tools will be crucial.

Researchers at Darpa, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, decided to tackle the problem by rethinking the way we translate languages. Instead of creating language-specific tools, Darpa is attempting to build language-agnostic tools that, once created, could spring into action in times of crisis and be tuned to any language with minor tweaking — even if they have just monolingual text scraped from social media rather than carefully translated parallel corpora.

They also changed their goals. It's too hard to jump right to full-blown machine translators that produce idiomatic prose, according to Dr. Boyan Onyshkevych, program manager at Darpa's Information Innovation Office. Instead, they carve out more manageable tasks, such as linking all the proper nouns in a passage with their equivalents in a more widely-spoken language. Automatically identifying entities in this way can help provide clues about the overall situation — say, which rivers are flooding, which villages are affected by an outbreak, or which people are missing.

Darpa funds researchers year-round at a couple dozen universities and companies; then, twice a year, they test them, in a "linguistic crisis simulation" event, where teams of researchers translate imaginary catastrophe reports in a surprise mystery language. For the first round, the teams have 24 hours to figure out as much useful information as possible from social media, blogs, and news reports, with the help of a few resources like a basic dictionary and an hour of time with a native speaker of the language. Then Darpa adds in more social media data and more time with a speaker, and the teams go at it again. Later, the results and data sets from such simulations are often published online so they can eventually be rolled into tools like Siri and Google Translate.

Methods like these use the resources of the internet age to solve the problems of the internet age. Smaller languages may not have extensive books or parliamentary records to train a language processor; they may not have very many professional translators. But they do have thousands or millions of speakers hanging out on social media and posting, like all of us do, about the weather and what they had for lunch. These posters are potentially sowing the seeds of their own survival, should catastrophe strike — their tweets and blog posts could get scooped up to teach the rest of the world how to help.

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